1880 – Heythrop Park, Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire

SM 40 – Sep 14

Thomas Brassey – the railway magnate – purchased Heythrop Park as a wedding present for his son, Alfred, in 1869.   He then commissioned Alfred Waterhouse, the Quaker architect who was also responsible for the design of the Natural History Museum, Strangeways Prison and Pierremont Park in Darlington, Co Durham Continue reading “1880 – Heythrop Park, Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire”

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1881-92 – Holly Hill Park, Sarisbury, Hampshire

People and Places Discussed and Pictured in Chapter 13 of: Continue reading “1881-92 – Holly Hill Park, Sarisbury, Hampshire”

1868-1905 – Sandringham Royal Estate

People and Places Discussed and Pictured in Chapter 8 of: Continue reading “1868-1905 – Sandringham Royal Estate”

1874 – Gunnersbury Park, Hounslow, London

SM 15 – Aug 12

The 186-acre estate of Gunnersbury, on the boundaries of Hounslow and Ealing, in southwest London, was once owned by the Bishops of London, but was purchased by Princess Amelia, favourite daughter of George II, in 1761.[i]   She improved the estate, and used it as her summer residence until her death in 1786, and Princess Amelia’s Bath House – a battlemented Gothic style building at the far end of the terrace to the house – still survives. Continue reading “1874 – Gunnersbury Park, Hounslow, London”

1869 – Pierremont Park, Darlington, Co. Durham

SM 10 – Mar 12

Soon after James Pulham and Son built the striking new boat house at Sandringham in 1868, they were asked to build another on a magnificent country estate called Pierremont, in Darlington, County Durham.   The mansion was a fine example of Gothic design, and was once the home of Henry Pease, a member of one of Darlington’s foremost Quaker families, and youngest son of Edward Pease, the ‘Father of the Railways’.   Fig 1 is a photograph of Pierremont House, taken c.1875. Continue reading “1869 – Pierremont Park, Darlington, Co. Durham”

1898-99 – Sunningdale Park, Ascot, Berkshire

SM 03 – Aug 11

Sunningdale Park is situated in what once used to be part of Windsor Great Park, and still contains a Spanish Chestnut tree – with a girth in excess of twenty feet! – that dates back to the time of Henry VIII.   James Wyatt built the first house at Sunningdale in 1785, and, over the years, this was rebuilt and enlarged by its successive owners until Major William James Joicey – of the Northern mining family – bought it in 1890. Continue reading “1898-99 – Sunningdale Park, Ascot, Berkshire”