A Fascinating Day in Woodbridge

I promised in my last News Letter that I would write a short account of a visit that Val and I made to Woodbridge in October..   I think it was possibly the only wet day during the whole of the month, but it was nevertheless a fascinating trip.   We had been to Woodbridge before, but this was the first time we gave ourselves the opportunity to look around some of the Pulhams’ old Home Town. Continue reading “A Fascinating Day in Woodbridge”

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James Pulham in Scotland

130900 - Scottish Rock Garden Cover 600 x 850by Claude Hitching

(This is the complete article – a few deletions were necessary during the editing process due to space limitations is July 2013 Issue of The Rock Garden)

James Pulham and Son are best remembered these days for the picturesque rock gardens, ferneries, follies and grottoes they constructed during the Victorian years.   Continue reading “James Pulham in Scotland”

The Pulham Legacy in London

James Pulham and Son, the eminent firm of Victorian and Edwardian landscape artists, are mostly remembered today for their picturesque rock gardens, ferneries, follies and grottoes with which they embellished many of the great country estates and parks around the country, but, as garden fashions evolved around the turn of the 20th Century, they also extended their portfolio to include grand, balustraded terraces, and formal Italian and Japanese-styled gardens.   They supplemented this by manufacturing a wide range of very high-quality garden ornaments, such as fountains, vases, urns, seats and balustrading etc in their Manufactory in Broxbourne, Hertfordshire.   Continue reading “The Pulham Legacy in London”

James Pulham in Wales

James Pulham and Son are best remembered these days for the picturesque rock gardens, ferneries, follies and grottoes they constructed during the Victorian years.   This was the time when tourists returning home from their ‘Grand Tours’ of Europe sought to create natural habitats in their gardens for the ferns and Alpine plants they had collected during their travels.   Hence the fashion for rock gardens, and, if natural rocks were not economically available, the Pulham craftsmen would ‘make their own’ by building up heaps of rubble and old bricks, and coating them with their own proprietary brand of cement that soon became known as Pulhamite.   The craftsmanship of the ‘rock builders’ lay in their ability to sculpt the surfaces to simulate the colour and texture of natural rock.   Continue reading “James Pulham in Wales”